Artists

John Copnall (1928-2007)

John’s paintings slowly evolved throughout his career.  It was not until he returned to London in 1968 after ‘painting ‘in isolation’ as he put it, in Andalucia for about twelve years, that he first saw the new work that was coming out of America.  Intoxicated by painters such as Morris Louis, he used acrylic for the first time, pouring vibrant colours directly onto large sheets of cotton duck.  By the early 1980’s he eventually re-discovered the paintbrush and, still using Acrylic as a medium, created several series of different variations in form to which he gave names such as ‘Radiences’,’ Pentacles’ ‘Orbits.’


 

‘John Copnall is a painter of great integrity.  He is also a painter who has much to offer in terms of sheer visual delight’ –  Edward Lucie Smith


Artist Collection

Please contact us on gallery@thesodencollection.com to find out more information and availability.

John Dyer

John Dyer is Cornwall's best known and best loved contemporary artist. His work is known all over the world through his many art prints, posters and exhibitions. He has a unique way of capturing the essence of his subject and his work celebrates the song of life. John Dyer's work hangs in the UK's national art collections with Falmouth Art Gallery, The Eden Project, Save the Children, the National Trust and the NHS. His work brings a huge amount of joy to all who view. We are delighted to represent all of John Dyer's paintings, signed prints and art posters and also work with the artist on his global projects and exhibitions which have included work with the Tall Ships Sail Training International, Survival International, the Eden Project and NGOs in Costa Rica, the Philippines and Peru.

Artist Collection

Please contact us on gallery@thesodencollection.com to find out more information and availability.

John Hoyland (1934-2011)

Hoyland’s work in his finals show so shocked the Royal Academy Schools that the then president of the RA ordered it off the walls.


Born in Sheffield in 1934, John Hoyland exhibited his first fully abstract paintings in 1960 with the influential Situation group just months after leaving the Royal Academy. Over the next decade his career took off and in 1964 he was selected as one of curator Bryan Robertson’s New Generation artists for his exhibition of young talent at the Whitechapel Gallery. It was a generation that included Patrick Caulfield, David Hockney, Paul Huxley, Allen Jones and Bridget Riley.



Artist Collection

John Hoyland (1934-2011)
Untitled Red & Orange

£1,950

John Hoyland (1934-2011)
Untitled

POA

Jonathan Truss



Established as one of the UK’s leading wildlife artists, Jonathan is known the world over for his magnificent paintings and drawings. His artwork graces the walls of private residences and corporations from New York to New Zealand, from Botswana to Beverly Hills, demonstrating the broad appeal of both his style and his subject matter.

Jonathan’s enthusiasm for the animals he portrays, and the never ending exciting trail for new ideas extends to annual trips, camping under canvas in the incredible game parks of Botswana, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Tanzania, and Zambia. On several occasions he has conducted art safaris in Africa, India and South America.




Supporting the conservation of many endangered species, Jonathan has raised thousands of pounds for wildlife causes. Frequently in the media spotlight, he has made over 100 television appearances and has been featured in many national and international magazines. He is a member of the prestigious American organization ‘The Society of Animal Artists’ and also the US-based ‘Artists for Conservation’, and his paintings have been sold through major auction houses, including Christies and Sotheby’s.

Jonathan has won an impressive array of accolades for his artwork; recently he was a finalist in both the BBC Wildlife Artist of the Year and the David Shepherd Wildlife Artist of the Year. He is also one of the co-authors of a major artbook entitled ‘How to Draw Wildlife’.

“Nothing seems more natural or enjoyable to me than painting wildlife. Nature has already painted its masterpiece… it’s all the inspiration I need!”



Artist Collection

Jonathan Truss
Tiger

POA

Julian Jeffrey

Julian Jeffery was born in Staffordshire in 1973 and after leaving school at the age of 16, trained to be a stonemason with Staffordshire Stone.

Following in his father’s footsteps, Julian has worked on some of the UK’s most prestigious stone projects including the refurbishment of Hereford Cathedral.
In 1993 Julian was accepted at Stafford College to study figurative sculpture, where he was renowned for his creative flair and eye for detail.
Studying sculpture enabled him to develop his repertoire and bring to life his imagination in this three-dimensional discipline.
Upon graduation, Julian was commissioned to create a range of private commissions, starting in 1997 with the life and a half bronze of Sit Stanley Matthews.

Artist Collection

Julian Jeffrey
A Sporting Shot

POA

Julian Jeffrey
Three for the Bag

POA

Julian Jeffrey
A Cunning Move

POA

Julian Opie (b.1958)

Julian Opie (British, b.1958) is a sculptor and digital artist associated with the New British Sculpture movement, and best known for portraits that reduce subjects to essential lines and color planes. Born in Oxford, he studied at Goldsmith’s School of Art from 1979 to 1983, during which time he created the series Eat Dirt, Art History of tongue-in-cheek copies of famous artworks. In his early work, Opie made steel sculptures of domestic appliances, architectural structures and abstract, geometrical shapes. More recently, he has focused on digital media such as LED projections and graphic art. His work draws on classical portraiture, Japanese woodblock prints and Pop Art aesthetics, particularly the work of Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein.

Opie has created a stylized, fragmentary visual language that de-personalizes his subjects, but he includes details, such as an exotic flower in Muliati, Shop Assistant (2002), specific titles, and different colored background to distinguish each work. Opie has produced several continuous animations on LCD screens, such as Christine Blinking (1999) and Suzanne Walking (2002). A number of Opie’s works are displayed in public locations, such as Ann Dancing (2007), a sculpture of four LCD screens which was installed as part of the Indianapolis Cultural Trail. His work is included in several public collections, including the Tate Gallery in London, the National Museum of Art in Osaka, and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. He lives and works in London.

Artist Collection

Julian Opie (b.1958)
Gary, Popstar

POA

Juliet & Jamie Gutch

About us:

Jamie and I were introduced around fifteen years ago by a mutual friend who thought that the two people he knew who both made kinetic sculpture (mobiles) would probably have quite a lot in common! We have been married for 13 years and have been collaborating on art projects throughout that time alongside Jamie’s career in state education. We live and work in Ilkley with our two daughters.

 

Our themes:

There are a number of recurrent themes present in our work which we always explore through the abstract form of the ‘mobile’. These include migration, music, sound and quietness, physical and mental health, the complexity of relationships, the patterns and structures found in nature and in the animal world, questions of faith and issues relating to what is valued and what goes to waste. These themes are sometimes explored explicitly but are often also implicit and are buried more deeply in our working practices and in our motivations for continuing to create artworks.

Jamie and I believe passionately that mobiles possess a set of very specific formal and aesthetic qualities which make them relevant, compelling and unique in a number of ways. These are:

Balance – Mobiles embody the theme of balance and the ongoing search for it in all aspects of our lives and the world around us. They involve the counter-balancing of different, often heavy, elements but the points of equilibrium are miniscule. A single breath blowing on the shapes can radically change the way the mobile turns.

Freedom within a structure – The individual elements within each mobile have a limited sphere of movement but within that space they explore every possible configuration and relationship. It is impossible to predict the ever changing shapes that a mobile will create as it moves.

Mindfulness and engagement – The fluid movement of mobiles is engaging and they invite the viewer to search for the next shape, the next configuration. In this way they draw us in and ground us in the present moment, encouraging mindfulness and contemplation. As a result we have found that mobiles can perform a therapeutic function.

Secondary forms – Mobiles invite us to look at the changing spaces generated in-between the shapes and they interact with their physical context by creating shadows and framing what is behind them. These shadows and spaces can be seen as aesthetic experiences in their own right, in effect secondary artforms created by the original artwork as it interacts with its environment.

***

“I have always loved Juliet and Jamie’s work and admired it at exhibitions, but I never anticipated how much I would enjoy living with a mobile in my home. It has become a focal point in our living space, we watch it move, observe the shadows it creates at different times of the day and all of my family have commented on its calming nature. The oak and ash compliment the landscape beyond. It’s unique, beautifully made and a very special work of art.”

Jenni Smith

“What I love about Jamie and Juliet’s mobiles is that they give me such pleasure. I’ve hung mine in the dining area of my kitchen, and the changing light and air currents of the room reflect on the mobile under which I sit watching it change and move.”

Lady Diana Brittan

‘As a depression sufferer, to gaze at the silent, gentle movements casting weird and wonderful shadows on the wall has been therapeutic. My mobile is a beautifully crafted, moving piece of art! Thank you Juliet and Jamie.’

Marilyn Gordon

***

Working practices:

We have been making mobiles (at first independently of each other and then in partnership) for around 20 years and have developed a deep understanding of the artform as well as considerable expertise in a range of materials and processes.

In recent years we have settled upon a collaborative way of working in wood veneer which has distinct phases. The same process is used for large or small projects with only slight variations.

Phase 1 – Identification and exploration of theme

Phase 2 – Selection and generation of forms from initial drawings (2D)

Phase 4 – Creation of templates and cutting out the wooden veneer (2D)

Phase 5 – Creation of laminated shapes (3D)

Phase 6 – Trimming, mending and sanding

Phase 7 – Hanging of individual elements into final mobiles and selection of works that will form the series

Phase 8 – Finishing – Pieces are waxed, painted or paper/material is also sometimes used as a means of applying a coloured or textured finish.

Phase 9 – Creation of titles – The titles of pieces in a series are usually taken from a poem written by Juliet on the chosen theme. We often use or create collective nouns as the title of a series of works. The poem is often written over a period of time while the pieces are being made.

Phase 10 – Scaling up (if required) and installation

Artist Collection

Juliet & Jamie Gutch
Ebulliance

£850

Juliet & Jamie Gutch
Swift as Light

£850

Keith Haring (1958-1990)




Keith Haring was born on May 4, 1958 in Reading, Pennsylvania, and was raised in nearby Kutztown, Pennsylvania. He developed a love for drawing at a very early age, learning basic cartooning skills from his father and from the popular culture around him, such as Dr. Seuss and Walt Disney.

Upon graduation from high school in 1976, Haring enrolled in the Ivy School of Professional Art in Pittsburgh, a commercial arts school. He soon realized that he had little interest in becoming a commercial graphic artist and, after two semesters, dropped out. While in Pittsburgh, Haring continued to study and work on his own and in 1978 had a solo exhibition of his work at the Pittsburgh Arts and Crafts Center.

Later that same year, Haring moved to New York City and enrolled in the School of Visual Arts (SVA). In New York, Haring found a thriving alternative art community that was developing outside the gallery and museum system, in the downtown streets, the subways and spaces in clubs and former dance halls. Here he became friends with fellow artists Kenny Scharf and Jean-Michel Basquiat, as well as the musicians, performance artists and graffiti writers that comprised the burgeoning art community. Haring was swept up in the energy and spirit of this scene and began to organize and participate in exhibitions and performances at Club 57 and other alternative venues.

In addition to being impressed by the innovation and energy of his contemporaries, Haring was also inspired by the work of Jean Dubuffet, Pierre Alechinsky, William Burroughs, Brion Gysin and Robert Henri’s manifesto The Art Spirit, which asserted the fundamental independence of the artist. With these influences Haring was able to push his own youthful impulses toward a singular kind of graphic expression based on the primacy of the line. Also drawn to the public and participatory nature of Christo’s work, in particular Running Fence, and by Andy Warhol’s unique fusion of art and life, Haring was determined to devote his career to creating a truly public art.

As a student at SVA, Haring experimented with performance, video, installation and collage, while always maintaining a strong commitment to drawing. In 1980, Haring found a highly effective medium that allowed him to communicate with the wider audience he desired, when he noticed the unused advertising panels covered with matte black paper in a subway station. He began to create drawings in white chalk upon these blank paper panels throughout the subway system. Between 1980 and 1985, Haring produced hundreds of these public drawings in rapid rhythmic lines, sometimes creating as many as forty “subway drawings” in one day. This seamless flow of images became familiar to New York commuters, who often would stop to engage the artist when they encountered him at work. The subway became, as Haring said, a “laboratory” for working out his ideas and experimenting with his simple lines.

Between 1980 and 1989, Haring achieved international recognition and participated in numerous group and solo exhibitions. His first solo exhibition in New York.was held at the Westbeth Painters Space in 1981.  In 1982, he made his Soho gallery debut with an immensely popular and highly acclaimed one-man exhibition at the Tony Shafrazi Gallery. During this period, he also participated in renowned international survey exhibitions such as Documenta 7 in Kassel; the São Paulo Biennial; and the Whitney Biennial. Haring completed numerous public projects in the first half of the 80’s as well, ranging from an animation for the Spectacolor billboard in Times Square, designing sets and backdrops for theaters and clubs, developing watch designs for Swatch and an advertising campaign for Absolut vodka; and creating murals worldwide.

In April 1986, Haring opened the Pop Shop, a retail store in Soho selling T-shirts, toys, posters, buttons and magnets bearing his images. Haring considered the shop to be an extension of his work and painted the entire interior of the store in an abstract black on white mural, creating a striking and unique retail environment. The shop was intended to allow people greater access to his work, which was now readily available on products at a low cost. The shop received criticism from many in the art world, however Haring remained committed to his desire to make his artwork available to as wide an audience as possible, and received strong support for his project from friends, fans and mentors including Andy Warhol.

Throughout his career, Haring devoted much of his time to public works, which often carried social messages. He produced more than 50 public artworks between 1982 and 1989, in dozens of cities around the world, many of which were created for charities, hospitals, children’s day care centers and orphanages. The now famous Crack is Wackmural of 1986 has become a landmark along New York’s FDR Drive. Other projects include; a mural created for the 100th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty in 1986, on which Haring worked with 900 children; a mural on the exterior of Necker Children’s Hospital in Paris, France in 1987; and a mural painted on the western side of the Berlin Wall three years before its fall. Haring also held drawing workshops for children in schools and museums in New York, Amsterdam, London, Tokyo and Bordeaux, and produced imagery for many literacy programs and other public service campaigns.

Haring was diagnosed with AIDS in 1988. In 1989, he established the Keith Haring Foundation, its mandate being to provide funding and imagery to AIDS organizations and children’s programs, and to expand the audience for Haring’s work through exhibitions, publications and the licensing of his images. Haring enlisted his imagery during the last years of his life to speak about his own illness and generate activism and awareness about AIDS.

During a brief but intense career that spanned the 1980s, Haring’s work was featured in over 100 solo and group exhibitions. In 1986 alone, he was the subject of more than 40 newspaper and magazine articles. He was highly sought after to participate in collaborative projects ,and worked with artists and performers as diverse as Madonna, Grace Jones, Bill T. Jones, William Burroughs, Timothy Leary, Jenny Holzer, Yoko Ono and Andy Warhol. By expressing universal concepts of birth, death, love, sex and war, using a primacy of line and directness of message, Haring was able to attract a wide audience and assure the accessibility and staying power of his imagery, which has become a universally recognized visual language of the 20th century.

Keith Haring died of AIDS related complications at the age of 31 on February 16, 1990. A memorial service was held on May 4, 1990 at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City, with over 1,000 people in attendance.

Since his death, Haring has been the subject of several international retrospectives. The work of Keith Haring can be seen today in the exhibitions and collections of major museums around the world.





Artist Collection

Keith Haring (1958-1990)
Mouton Rothschilds 1988 Label (after Keith Haring)

£250

Ken Howard RA NEAC

live. He studied at the Hornsey College of Art and the Royal College of Art He was elected RA in 1991. He is a painter noted for his handling of light and for his depictions of nudes in interiors, beach scenes and paintings of Venice. The Imperial War Museum, Plymouth City Art Gallery, The National Army Museum and other provincial galleries own his work.

Artist Collection

Please contact us on gallery@thesodencollection.com to find out more information and availability.

Laurence Stephen Lowry (1887-1976)

Laurence Stephen Lowry was born in Rusholme, Manchester in November 1887, the only child of Irish-born R S Lowry and Elizabeth Lowry. He attended a local school in Victoria Park, but took private lessons from William Fitz, before starting work as a clerk for a firm of chartered accountants in 1904.

From 1905-1915 he attended drawing and painting classes at the Municipal College of Art (later Manchester College of Art, and now part of Manchester Metropolitan University), where he was tutored by Adolphe Valette. He moved to Pendlebury in Salford with his parents in 1909, where he was to live for nearly 40 years.

During this time he attended art classes at Salford School of Art, developing an interest in the urban and industrial landscape. He exhibited with the Manchester Academy of Fine Arts from 1919, as well as entering paintings in the Paris Salon. By the early 1930s he was exhibiting at the Royal Academy in London.

He was awarded an honorary MA at Manchester University in 1945, and Doctor of Letters in 1961, elected to the Royal Academy in 1962, and given freedom of the City of Salford in 1965 – many other honours followed later.

He lived in Mottram until he died in 1976.

Artist Collection

Laurence Stephen Lowry (1887-1976)
Man Looking out at Sea

POA

Laurence Stephen Lowry (1887-1976)
An Industrial Town

POA

Laurence Stephen Lowry (1887-1976)
Peel Park, Salford

POA

Laurence Stephen Lowry (1887-1976)
Castle by the Sea

POA

Laurence Stephen Lowry (1887-1976)
The Polling Station

POA

Lorenzo Quinn

Lorenzo Quinn
Italian, b. 1966

 
Contemporary Italian artist Lorenzo Quinn is a leading figurative sculptor whose work is inspired by such masters as Michelangelo, Bernini and Rodin. Exhibited internationally, his monumental public art and smaller, more intimate pieces transmit his passion for eternal values and authentic emotions. He is best known for expressive recreations of human hands. ‘I wanted to sculpt what is considered the hardest and most technically challenging part of the human body’, he asserts. ‘The hand holds so much power – the power to love, to hate, to create, to destroy.’

Born on 7 May 1966 in Rome to the Mexican-American actor Anthony Quinn and his second wife, costume designer Iolanda Addolori, Lorenzo Quinn had a childhood split between Italy and the United States of America. His father had a profound influence on him, both in terms of living in the limelight of the film world and with respect to Anthony’s early work in painting and architecture.

Lorenzo Quinn studied at the American Academy of Fine Arts in New York, planning to be a Surrealist painter. However, at 21 he decided that his future lay in sculpture, which could better accommodate his energy and originality. He vividly recalls the moment in 1989 when he felt that he had created his first genuine work of art: ‘I had made a torso from Michelangelo’s drawing of Adam … an artisan’s job…. I had an idea and began chiselling away, and Eve came out of Adam’s body…. It had started as a purely academic exercise, yet it had become an artwork.’

In 1988 Quinn married Giovanna Cicutto, and on the birth of the first of their three sons they decided to leave New York – a place that ‘hardens your human values’ – and settle in Spain. ‘We chose Spain for its Latin character, its fervour … the way it values people and family, and for its great artistic trajectory’, he comments.

In his twenties Quinn had a brief acting career, including playing alongside his father in Stradivari (1989) and an acclaimed performance as Salvador Dalí. However, he did not enjoy working in the profession and decided to concentrate purely on sculpture.

Quinn’s creative ideas spark quickly into life: ‘The inspiration comes within a millisecond’, he says, as he is driven to sculpt by observing life’s everyday energy. Yet a finished project takes months to realise, and it has to carry clear meaning. Quinn usually conceives each work in writing, and the poetic text is ultimately displayed with the sculpture, as an integral part of the piece, not merely explanation.

Quinn’s work appears in many private collections throughout the world and has been exhibited internationally during the past 20 years. Among his commissions is The Tree of Life, produced for the United Nations and issued by the organisation as a stamp in 1993. The following year the Vatican engaged him to sculpt the likeness of St Anthony for the Basilica del Santo in Padua, in commemoration of the 800th anniversary of the saint’s birth; the sculpture was blessed by the pope in St Peter’s Square, Rome, in front of a crowd of 35,000.

Quinn’s public art includes Encounters, a massive globe enclosing a pointing hand, which was unveiled in 2003 opposite the Museum of Modern Art in Palma de Mallorca, Spain. In Birmingham, The Tree of Life was erected outside St Martin’s Church in 2005 to commemorate those who died in the Second World War blitz on the city. Further works are on display at King Edward’s Wharf – Creation, Volare and Crossing a Millennium – with their characteristic focus on the hand, the human form and the circle.

In November 2005 one of Quinn’s largest public sculptures, Rise Through Education, was installed at ASPIRE, the Academy of Sports Excellence, in Doha, commissioned by the state of Qatar. Weighing an impressive 8 tonnes, this monument shows a pair of adult hands placing the world in a child’s hand, the arms forming a circle above an open book. The artist’s commentary on the piece states: ‘A child is the most precious asset our future has. Our obligation is their guidance…. It is only through education and knowledge that a person may master his life.’ Quinn created a second sculpture for the interior of the academy to depict striving for excellence; Reaching for Gold is a pyramid of seven arms emerging from a base of sand, the hands straining towards a medal.

Unique among his works as a living monument, Legacy (2006) was sculpted for Sant Climent de Llobregat in Spain. Quinn was fascinated by the story of the town’s cherry trees and decided to make a piece that reflected this tale. The tree-trunk is formed by a male and a female hand holding branches laden with cherries arranged to simulate human DNA. In this area famed for its juicy cherries, the sculpture carries as many fruit as there are people living in Sant Climent; each year further cherries will be added to represent new inhabitants.

In 2008 Evolution, a major exhibition of Quinn’s output, was chosen to inaugurate the new premises of Halcyon Gallery in Mayfair, London, and the gallery published an important book on his work. Many of the sculptures in Evolution featured the symbol that has become synonymous with Quinn: the human hand.

Equilibrium, an exhibition of Quinn’s monumental sculptures, followed in November 2009, coinciding with the installation of Give and Take III in Berkeley Square for six months. Included in the show were several important new sculptures, including What Came First? – male and female forms lying in egg-shaped hemispheres – and Home Sweet Home – a marble woman cocooned in barbed wire. The exhibition title reflects Quinn’s belief: ‘It is essential to find a balance in life. Many times that balance is achieved with the help of the people who surround us and hold us firmly to the ground, and without whom we would float into perdition.’

Quinn exhibited internationally during 2010, holding shows at the Rafart Gallery in Spain, the Rarity Gallery in Greece, the Hewar Art Gallery in Saudi Arabia, the Marigold Gallery in India and the Ode to Art Gallery in Singapore. His sculpture Vroom Vroom, a playful interpretation of the independence of young adulthood, was displayed at Valencia’s Institute of Modern Art in the summer and again later that year at the Abu Dhabi Art Fair. In January 2011 the work was installed in Park Lane, London, as part of Westminster Council’s City of Sculpture Festival, and Finding Lovewas unveiled at the entrance of the newly opened One Hyde Park building in Knightsbridge. Coinciding with two further prominent placements of Quinn’s monumental sculpture – The Force of Nature II in Berkeley Square and Volare in Cadogan Gardens – these pieces firmly launched Halcyon Gallery’s public sculpture trail in the city of London.

In spring 2011, Quinn was invited to participate in the first ever summer exhibition of outdoor sculpture in Rome. Planned as Rome’s Biennale di Scultura but subsequently renamed Rassegna Internazionale di Scultura di Roma, it featured a range of significant contemporary and historic artists. At the Casina Valadier in the Villa Borghese Park he exhibited La Dolce Vita, a piece representing the joie de vivre of that period and a ‘sense of total abandonment to the child within’. That summer he was also selected as the exhibiting artist for the Italian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. His powerful and provocative anti-war installation This is Not a Game was positioned across two different sites with a commentary that observed, ‘Leaders of the world use their armies as if they were some private little toy they can commandeer and destroy as a careless kid would’.

The high esteem in which Quinn is held is borne out by his invitation to exhibit Hand of God and Leap of Faith at the Winter Palace in the State Hermitage, St Petersburg, to coincide with the 2011 international White Nights arts festival. Displayed alongside works by Henry Moore, Quinn’s sculptures reflect his creative approach to the passage of time: ‘The past is set in stone, the present is carving itself in wood, and the future is an empty goblet to fill with dreams’.

Quinn’s spring 2012 retrospective at Harrods in London – his first solo exhibition at this world-famed location – presented pieces from the ‘Love’ series, photographic aluminium wall panels and a film exploring his work. One of the highlights of the show was the double sculpture Perfect Relationship (2011): a pair of graceful bronze hands rising from two nautilus fossils, shells that spiral in the proportions of the golden ratio and here symbolise the perfection of soul mates in love. Another prestigious London opportunity was the installation of La Dolce Vita in Park Lane at the end of September 2012.

In the United States, Halcyon Gallery donated Quinn’s The Force of Nature II, a piece created in the wake of the 2009 tsunami, to benefit two non-profit organisations: the Happy Hearts Fund, established to rebuild communities after natural disasters, and the March to the Top Foundation, helping Africans affected by economic poverty. The sculpture, so clearly symbolic of human strength and resilience in the face of adversity, has a specially constructed base with tiers of donor plaques, and proceeds from them will fund the construction of two new schools. In October 2012, The Force of Nature II was installed at the Paramount Group’s magnificent skyscraper on the Avenue of the Americas in New York. Complementing this pairing of public art with philanthropy is a further placement of The Force of Nature II at a cultural development project on the seafront at Doha in Qatar aiming to encourage and promote the arts.

More recently, in February 2014 the toy manufacturer BRUDER Spielwaren GmbH + Co. KG devised, commissioned and donated Dreams Come True to the City of Fuerth, Germany. At 3 x 16 metres this monumental sculpture depicts the hands of a child immersed in the colourful play-world of building and construction, complete with an excavator, dumpster and life-sized toy construction workers. Also in the same year, Quinn’s sculptures Love and Emotions were donated for auction, raising more than £300,000 for the Sunrise K’ Foundation for children with glaucoma and the EORTC, the European organisation for the research and treatment of cancer.

Full Circle (2013), Quinn’s fifth solo exhibition at Halcyon Gallery, London, marked a pivotal moment in the artist’s career. Displaying new works interspersed with older and more familiar pieces, the show represented the artist’s experimentation with new materials and themes highlighting his creative development over the last decade. Following the exhibition on New Bond Street which ran the length of the summer, Full Circle was then showcased at Halcyon Gallery, Harrods towards the end of 2013.

Throughout 2013 and 2014, Quinn exhibited at a number of important international art fairs including Art Monaco ’13; Art Palm Beach; Miami International Art Fair; PINTA, London; SCOPE, New York and Art Toronto, Canada. During this period the artist was also awarded several public placements, including the installation of new works Tight Rope II and The Four Loves (alongside The Force of Nature II), on the island of Ibiza in 2013. In December 2014, Quinn returned to Park Lane to unveil Harmony, his unique interpretation of the traditional Yin and Yang symbol. Displayed in the UK for the first time, the monumental piece measures 3m in height, and is cast in polished aluminum and stainless steel.

In April 2015, Halcyon Gallery announced its partnership with Gallery Odyssey in association with the Indiabulls Group in Mumbai, with the inaugural exhibition In the Hands of Lorenzo Quinn. The first time Quinn’s work has been exhibited in India, this career defining show runs throughout the summer while such monumental works as Leap of Faith, The Force of Nature II and Love are displayed to the public within the grounds of the Indiabulls headquarters in Mumbai as part of its commitment to supporting art and cultural programmes locally and internationally.

Art historian and curator Consuelo Císcar Casabán describes Quinn’s work as ‘profound, spiritual and existential because it deals with the passions we experience as humans and the questions we pose in the silence about ultimate truth…. these are sculptures based on great myths, referring to the broad themes that recur in our civilisation and cut across distinctions of culture and time.’

Artist Collection

Lorenzo Quinn
During Love

£6,500

Lucian Freud (1922-2011)



Artist Collection

Lucian Freud (1922-2011)
Lucian Freud by Sir Lawrence Gowing including an Etching, “A Couple”.

POA

Lucian Freud (1922-2011)
Head & Shoulders

POA

Margaret Lovell

Margaret Lovell D.LITT, FRBS, RWA


 

Margaret Lovell is an award-winning sculptor and a Fellow of the Royal British Society of Sculptors. She trained at the Slade, London and the Academy of Fine Arts , Florence and has undertaken commissions across the UK, Europe and the USA. Her work, mostly in bronze, can be found in the collections of The Arts Council of Great Britain, Barclays Bank and Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery among many other public and private collections.

Artist Collection

Margaret Lovell
Inside a Helmet

POA

Mark Beattie MRBS

Sculptor Mark Beattie has exhibited his works nationally, alongside some of great artists as Tracey Emin, the late Lynn Chadwick, Helaine Blumenfeld ad Jonathan Yeo. Working with various metals in all their contrasting properties of texture and finish. Mark can make industrious material appear fluid, malleable and delicate. He continues to study different metals, looking at ways to manipulate and add movement to the material, and over the past 18 months and developing ways in which neon or LEDs can compliment his sculptures, adding to the movement of a piece and catching the viewers eye.

Artist Collection

Mark Beattie MRBS
Neon Orb 171

£1,250

Mark Beattie MRBS
Verdigris Orb

£2,250

Mark Beattie MRBS
Copper in Verdigris XI

£1,450

Mark Beattie MRBS
Mark Beattie MRBS

£1,150

Mark Payne

Born in Luton, Mark studied technical and scientific illustration for four years. After graduation he became a member of the Society of Illustrators, Artists and Designers (SIAD). Since then, he has had a full and demanding 33 year career as a full-time artist and illustrator, producing work for numerous national and international publishers, advertising agencies and galleries. Mark has served with the Artists’ Rifles; he is also the founder of CGI-company, Mission 3D.

Outside of work, Mark is a keen rider who has learnt the hard way that you can lead a horse to water, but that’s about all you can do with it! He also loves being taken for a walk by his two young Schnauzers, Connie and Alf. For relaxation, as well as his love of painting, Mark is a part-time student of classical history at the University of London.



I love books. Real books, as tactile objects that you can feel the weight of in your hands, leaf through, and into which you can simply disappear. Of course, like most booklovers, the excitement of a new novel, especially of a favourite author, is always an occasion to be savoured. But I find the books I treasure most become old friends. I love to revisit them, and celebrate down the years their graceful journey as they age – so often to marvel at their maturity, and sometimes to stand back with wonder as my youthful friend has become a classic! I love the feel of these my inanimate friends, who live with me and in me so vividly. Their stories, their feel, their warmth and their comfortable familiarity, – it is all these qualities that inspire me to paint them.

THE BOOKS I PAINT


Most of the books I’ve painted are very old and have had many owners, yet their fine condition suggests a much pampered life in careful hands. Others have not been so lucky. With creaking spines, dog-eared and with fading colour, they may be battle-scarred, but they are still as precious. Many of the books I paint are now quite rare and sourcing them has required great patience, while others, I’ve simply stumbled upon, languishing unnoticed and un-remembered on dusty shelves in second-hand book shops. But, good design is timeless and as precious as what is contained in the treasure between the covers. These books, I am deeply convinced, deserve to be noticed.

While wanting to honour and pay tribute to the original jacket designers and their unquestionable talents, my paintings are portraits of some very old, well-loved books, the way they are now. Novels, poetry, history and a range of subjects all attract my interest. It may not be possible to judge a book by its cover each and every time, but a great engraving or a modern jacket certainly promises much.

The paintings themselves are much larger than life with every tear, crease and blemish, carefully and accurately recorded. You see my aim is not just to reproduce the original cover artwork like a poster. It is to paint the whole book as a real, three-dimensional object with all its imperfections – the evidence of life – so that when mounted and sensitively lit, the illusion is created of a real, giant 3D book. It really is a living thing.




Artist Collection

Mark Payne
Swallowfield

£4,950

Mark Payne
Swallowfield – A Fresh Start

£4,250

Mark Payne
Morning Run III

POA

Mark Payne
Amber Light

£2,950

Mark Payne
Dappled Light

POA

Mark Payne
The Theatre, New York, November 1914

£4,250

Mark Payne
The Theatre, New York, January 1917

£4,250

Mark Payne
Theatre Magazine, New York, October 1923

£4,250

Mark Payne
Cosmopolitan, New York, February 1948

£4,250

Mark Payne
Cosmopolitan (Mono) New York, September 1948

£4,250

Mark Payne
Cosmopolitan – September 1948

POA

Mark Payne
Enchanted Forest

£4,250

Mark Payne
Climbing Tree

£4,250

Mark Payne
Cosmopolitan, New York, May 1950

£4,250

Mark Payne
La Guerre des Mondes

POA

Mark Payne
Richmond Park

£4,250

Mark Payne
L’Homme Invisable

POA

Mark Payne
Silver Light II

POA

Mark Payne
Toboggan Run

£3,950

Mark Payne
Hinchingbrook Park

POA

Mark Payne
Silver Light

POA

Mark Payne
Base Camp

POA

Mark Payne
These Times of Travail

POA

Mark Payne
Bonjour Tristesse

POA

Mark Payne
Beware the Curves by Erle Stanley Gardner

POA

Mark Payne
Beyond by John Galsworthy

POA

Mark Payne
The Man Who Sold the Moon by Robert A. Heinlein

POA

Mark Payne
Morning Run

POA

Mark Woollacott

Mark is a professional marine artist based in South West England. He was born in the mid sixties and has been painting maritime scenes for many years and regularly undertakes painting commissions. Mark is perhaps most well known for his large detailed paintings of J Class yachts and America's Cup racing catamarans. He also produces realistic paintings of schooners and small classic yachts.

His paintings have featured on online publications such as Classic Boat Magazine and Yachting Monthly Magazine and have also featured in a book, written by author Robin Whitcomb. He has donated artwork to The Prince's Trust and his paintings have featured at various exhibitions, including a major London Art Fair (where his paintings are exhibited each year), and he also has gallery representation at Windsor. Most of his paintings are now in private collections in the United Kingdom, but there are also a number of his originals and prints in small private collections in The Netherlands, Spain, USA, Australia and in Germany.

Artist Collection

Mark Woollacott
Crew Hiking out as Lion Heart heels over

POA

Mark Woollacott
J Class Yacht Lion Heart

POA

Mark Woollacott
Veolia Trimaran

POA

Mark Woollacott
Cowes Week

POA

Mary Fedden

Mary Fedden was born in Bristol and was married to the artist Julian Trevelyan. She studied at the Slade School of Fine Art and taught painting at the Royal College of Art. She was elected to the Royal academy in 1992. She has exhibited every year since 1947 and her work hangs in many private collections including HM The Queen for Windsor Castle, Prince Hassan of Jordan, the Tate Gallery, Bristol City Art Gallery and The Royal Academy.

Artist Collection

Please contact us on gallery@thesodencollection.com to find out more information and availability.

Mary Fedden (1915-2012)

Mary Fedden was born in Bristol and wanted to be a painter even as a child. Leaving Badminton School at sixteen, she studied at the Slade School of Art in London from 1932 to 1936 under the theatre designer Vladimir Polunin, who had worked with the Ballets Russes. She painted sets for professional performances at Sadlers Wells, but decided against stage design as a career. Returning to Bristol, she taught art and made a living by painting portraits. During the war she served in the Land Army and the Woman's Voluntary Service, and on settling in London she worked as a stage painter for the Arts Theatre in Great Newport Street and produced propaganda murals. In 1944 she was called up, and sent abroad as a driver for the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes (NAAFI).

In 1946 she resumed easel painting. She held her first exhibition at the Mansard Gallery in Heal's Department Store in 1947, showing a number of still life and flower paintings. She was subsequently commissioned to paint covers for Woman magazine. In 1949 she moved to Durham Wharf, a complex of studios on the Thames at Chiswick, where she still lives and works. In 1951 she married the artist Julian Trevelyan, whom she had met before the war. Together they travelled in Europe, Africa, India, Russia and America. Since 1946 Fedden has painted prolifically and has had regular exhibitions at the Redfern Gallery, the New Grafton Gallery and many other galleries throughout Britain. She painted murals for the Television pavilion at the 1951 Festival of Britain. From the late 1950s she taught painting at the Royal College of Art. In 1992 she was elected to the Royal Academy and she has been a member of the Royal West of England Academy at Bristol since the mid-1930s, serving as its President from 1984 to 1988.

Artist Collection

Mary Fedden (1915-2012)
Fish, Butterfly, Lemon & Feather

POA

Michael Ashcroft

Born in 1969, Michael John Ashcroft grew up in a small village called Croston in the heart of Lancashire and from an early age he had a keen interest in all things arty.  After leaving school in 1985 with top grades in art he began his career as an engineer, painting and sketching only in his spare time.  In 1998 he had a major operation to remove a brain tumour and decided to paint more seriously.  He returned back to college and completed numerous classes in art including A- level fine art, OCA in portraiture and life drawing classes which he continues to do on a weekly basis.


His paintings have evolved over the years from early abstract acrylics to using oils and more representational works. The foundations that underpin his paintings hasn’t changed and that is his fascination with light and dark and his love for the city and the landscape.


Michael’s work has become highly sought after and he is seen as being a painter using traditional methods as David Lee Art Critic and editor of the art review magazine The Jackdaw quoted:


 There are no secrets in what he does. Being open and honest he tells you directly through his pictures where his interests lie. We don’t have to be told by experts the meaning of his work because they are self-evident – we can see them for ourselves. In his landscapes as well as his views of the city, he wi­llingly lays bare his pleasures and beliefs. You can’t ask more of any artist than this. He is a worthy heir of those in the great tradition of Lancashire painters.


Michael has gained many awards over the years; his recent ones include being accepted into the Manchester Academy of Fine Arts and gaining entry into the Royal Institute of Oil Painters,  Royal Society of British Artists and the Howard De Walden Exhibitions in London.  His work also gained him a place at the Mall Galleries were he beat over three thousand artists competing on the BBC 2 Art program, Show Me The Monet and became one of only thirty to show their work at the Mall Galleries, London.



Artist Collection

Michael Ashcroft
A Tale of Two Pubs, Marylebone

£2,950

Michael Ashcroft
Early Doors, The Harold Pinter Theatre, London

£1,450

Michael Ashcroft
Night Rider, London

£1,450

Natalie Toplass

Born in Cheshire and now living in Shropshire Natalie graduated from the University of Central Lancashire and later specialised in Stage Set Design at the Welsh College of Music and Drama in Cardiff.

Since 2004 she has been working on a series of intricate flower and bird portraits and has had a number of well-received exhibitions throughout Great Britain

Influences
Natalie’s paintings create an impact of emotion and atmosphere direct in their manipulation of texture, light and darkness.
Her work is often described as photorealistic but her interest is more with colour
and richness of texture. The scale of her work is an important feature providing a fresh view of a common subject.

“My painting process is related to the luminosity between layers, the subject is just the starting point for an abstract study of transparency and form.”

Artist Collection

Natalie Toplass
Ranunculus

£2,300

Natalie Toplass
Parrot Tulip II

£2,300

Natalie Toplass
White Hellebore

£2,300

Natalie Toplass
Honesty

£1,800

Natalie Toplass
Sweet William – Dianthus barbatus

£3,950

Natalie Toplass
Purple Kaleidoscope

POA

Natalie Toplass
Umber Kaleidoscope

POA

Natalie Toplass
Red Kaleidoscope

POA

Natalie Toplass
Kingfisher

£1,950

Natalie Toplass
Cala Lily

£1,500

Natalie Toplass
Blue Hydrangea

£1,500

Nigel Hemming

Living with his own dogs made Nigel a keen observer of canine behaviour and his images reflect this deep understanding of his subject.

Devotees find his paintings irresistible - seeing many of their own special animal''s endearing traits captured on canvas.

Nigel''s work has been published in limited edition form since the mid 1980''s, enjoying increasing popularity with each new edition. His published works and original paintings have featured in one-man shows as well as a number of shared exhibitions. His work is collected throughout the U.K., Europe, and the U.S.A.

In1996 Nigel received the Fine Art Trade Guild''s Published Artist of the Year award.

Artist Collection

Nigel Hemming
Puppies

POA

Patrick Heron (1920-1999)

Patrick Heron CBE (30 January 1920 – 20 March 1999) was a British abstract and figurative artist, writer, and polemicist, who lived in Zennor, Cornwall.

Artist Collection

Patrick Heron (1920-1999)
Small Red January 1972 No. 2

POA

Patrick Heron (1920-1999)
January 1973: Plate 7

POA

Patrick Heron (1920-1999)
October 5 1982

POA

Patrick Heron (1920-1999)
January 1973: 19

POA

Patrick Joseph Caulfield (1936-2005)

Patrick Joseph Caulfield, CBE, RA (29 January 1936 – 29 September 2005), was an English painter and printmaker known for his bold canvases, which often incorporated elements of photorealism within a pared-down scene. Examples of his work are Pottery and Still Life Ingredients.

Artist Collection

Patrick Joseph Caulfield (1936-2005)
Plant Pot

POA

Patrick Joseph Caulfield (1936-2005)
Occasional Table

POA

Patrick Joseph Caulfield (1936-2005)
Vase on Display

POA

Patrick Joseph Caulfield (1936-2005)
Pitcher

POA

Patrick Joseph Caulfield (1936-2005)
Brown Jug

POA

Patrick Joseph Caulfield (1936-2005)
Water Jug

POA

Patrick Joseph Caulfield (1936-2005)
Pink Jug

POA

Patrick Joseph Caulfield (1936-2005)
Picnic Set

POA

Patrick Joseph Caulfield (1936-2005)
She’ll have forgotten her scarf (From some poems of Jules Laforgue)

POA

Patrick Venton (1925-1987)

Venton was born and educated in Birmingham. He worked as a clerk for a short time before joining the Army but was invalided out after three years with serious clinical depression, for which he received electric shock treatment. His elder brother was killed at Arnhem, an event the family never really recovered from and which contributed to Venton’s state of mind.

After being demobbed in 1946, he attended the Birmingham College of Art, where he met and married his wife Zena in 1951. In his early years he was interested in Surrealism and for a while had a painting room in the house of Conroy Maddox. Venton lectured at Birmingham College of Art and later in London at Heatherley’s College of Art, but despite the appreciation and admiration he received from many leading contemporary artists of the time, Venton remained in the words of a colleague, “a very private person, an observer, diffident about exhibiting”.

Venton’s work won the prestigious painting prize in the John Moores Exhibition in 1957 which is now in the collection of the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool. In 1965 Birmingham City Art Gallery added ‘Studio Table No. 1’ to it’s collection. The following year he was given a solo show at the Ikon Gallery in Birmingham and a further four paintings were also exhibited in 2004 at the Ikon Gallery retrospective, for many visitors these works proving a revelation, which offered a tantalizing glimpse of a mature and hitherto largely unknown talent.

Artist Collection

Patrick Venton (1925-1987)
Studio Table with Bottles – 1956

POA

Paul James

A leading contemporary animal and landscape realist painter renowned for the skill and craftsmanship with which he depicts the fine detail and realism of the many textures portrayed within his imagery. He is an exceptionally gifted and unique animal and landscape artist. Essentially self-taught, Paul began painting professionally in 1986 and it was the haunting beauty of Charnwood forest that greatly influenced his early atmospheric landscape, together with his animal portraiture for which he has perfected a style of his own.The originality of his compositions along with the attention to detail means that his works take time. Paul dedicates himself to each piece with a passion rarely seen in today's commercial art world, insisting on the freedom to paint the subjects he chooses which allows him creative flexibility, and it's this freedom that keeps his work fresh and current.

Artist Collection

Paul James
Magpie

POA

Peter Cosslett

As a Torbay based artist Peter Cosslett has made coastal subjects very much his speciality; the sea crashing over the rocks, long lazy waves breaking on the beach, moonlight glinting through the surf. In the chaos of modern life, these images represent escapism and relaxation and inevitably have an enduring appeal as rich oils on canvas. Peter Cosslett is probably the finest present day realist painter of British Seascapes, and has been working as a collectable full time artist since 1971. His success stems from his fine brushstrokes and close observation of how the sea behaves around the local coast line.
Born in Cardiff in 1927 Peter started his working life in the merchant marines, where he first became fascinated with the power of the sea. After the war he took up painting as a pastime. A serious illness which resulted in a leg amputation was a turning point for Peter and he decided to try to make a career out of his paintings, the one thing he loves. He started to attend art classes at night school but was told that there was no more they could teach him. He continued to teach himself through a process of trial and error.
Peter is a committed and meticulous artist who has overcome misfortune to become a very highly sought after and successful artist.

Artist Collection

Peter Cosslett
Mother Ivey’s – Cornwall

POA

Peter Cosslett
Crashing Waves

POA

Peter Cosslett
Sea Mist

POA

Peter Cosslett
Moonlight

POA

Rob Hefferan



His varied body of work celebrates the joyous and multifaceted forms that human beings express with limitless imagination and wit. Rob captures the personality of each of his subjects with honesty, integrity and above all, a sacred appreciation for the unique spirit embodied within us all. His heartfelt response to humanity is woven into the very fabric of each outstanding portrait, earning him the reputation of one of the finest contemporary realists of his generation.

As life is in a constant state of flux and renewal, so this universal law is reflected in the changing temper of Rob’s work. Brave, forward thinking and always challenging, Rob experiments with themes, moods and styles to create thought provoking visual statements that inspire us to see beyond our limited and cultural frames of reference.

Whether working with chalk pastels, oils or acrylics, Rob’s ability and innate flair see him capture life as it is lived. His sensitive capacity to see beyond our masks and reveal the touching truth of who we really are is a testament to his deep insight. This ability animates and imbues every brushstroke with palpable verve and originality that reach out from the canvas to embrace our senses in a delightful interplay that is the hallmark of the truly talented artist.



“Rob’s ability and innate flair see him capture life as it is lived ”


Born in 1968 in Warrington, Cheshire, Rob Hefferan is an exceptionally talented figurative artist. His work not only captures the unique character and warmth of each subject, but transcends form to suggest the living, breathing essence of the individual.

Working predominately with oils and acrylics, Rob’s work is both eminently understandable and intensely familiar. Colour, light and texture harmonise intelligently and with stunning candour to produce works that resonate with vibrant life.

The pinnacle of figurative realism is to elicit the animating force that resides behind the density and delicacy of human form and structure. Working with the living architecture of the human body, Rob recreates the poetry of the skin’s tone and structure and pays homage to the complex interaction of musculature, tissue and bone. Every brushstroke has the ability to reach out from the canvas to embrace our senses.



Artist Collection

POA

Rob Leckey



Artist Collection

Rob Leckey
Old St. Chads Square Shrewsbury

£750

Rob Leckey
Yorkshire Dales Farm

£695

Rob Leckey
Approaching Yorkshire Dales Farm

£695

Rob Leckey
Old St.Chads Church by Rob Leckey

POA

Rob Leckey
Anstruther Harbour

POA

Rob Leckey
Abersoch Beach

£695

Rob Leckey
Carnloch Harbour – Northern Ireland

£695